To learn more about ICANN and Internet Governance, read Nine Questions for the Web’s Administrators.

Uncle Sam Controlled it All
Uncle Sam Controlled it All

The Internet grew out of ARPANET, the Advanced Research Project Agency’s network for sharing research between four US universities: Stanford, UCLA, UCSB, and University of Utah. The first message was sent across the network in late 1969. For nearly 30 years, the US Government controlled the Domain Name System of the Internet.

The Man Behind ICANN
The Man Behind ICANN

ICANN was established in 1998 thanks primarily to the work of Jon Postel of UCLA who, tragically, passed away that same year.  Postel spearheaded the transition of the Internet’s naming system and technical maintenance from the US Government to ICANN – a private, non-profit organization contracted by the US Department of Commerce (DOC) for this task. Image credit: Irene Fertik, USC News Service

Uncle Sam Controlled it All
Uncle Sam Controlled it All

The Internet grew out of ARPANET, the Advanced Research Project Agency’s network for sharing research between four US universities: Stanford, UCLA, UCSB, and University of Utah. The first message was sent across the network in late 1969. For nearly 30 years, the US Government controlled the Domain Name System of the Internet.

The Snowden Effect
The Snowden Effect

On March 14, 2014, the US DOC announced that it was proceeding with plans to transfer full control of DNS responsibilities to ICANN, something that had always been foreseen. Demands for this transfer have accelerated recently, however, in light of scandals such as the Edward Snowden revelations about National Security Agency actions.

The Man Behind ICANN
The Man Behind ICANN

ICANN was established in 1998 thanks primarily to the work of Jon Postel of UCLA who, tragically, passed away that same year.  Postel spearheaded the transition of the Internet’s naming system and technical maintenance from the US Government to ICANN – a private, non-profit organization contracted by the US Department of Commerce (DOC) for this task. Image credit: Irene Fertik, USC News Service

It Takes a Village
It Takes a Village

ICANN is one of a number of bodies involved in Internet governance alongside the US-based nonprofit Internet Society and its standards organization, the Internet Engineering Task Force; the UN’s International Telecommunications Union; the independent members of the Internet Governance Caucus; and the World Wide Web Consortium, among others.

The Snowden Effect
The Snowden Effect

On March 14, 2014, the US DOC announced that it was proceeding with plans to transfer full control of DNS responsibilities to ICANN, something that had always been foreseen. Demands for this transfer have accelerated recently, however, in light of scandals such as the Edward Snowden revelations about National Security Agency actions.

Real Global Governance
Real Global Governance

ICANN’s work is governed by a multi-stakeholder model with participants from civil society, governments, research institutions, NGOs, technical groups, and companies. ICANN will use this model to define a transition plan away from US DOC oversight in the coming year. The multi-stakeholder model is different than the multilateral model proposed through the UN and believed to be more responsive to the needs of users, as well as less subject to political considerations.

It Takes a Village
It Takes a Village

ICANN is one of a number of bodies involved in Internet governance alongside the US-based nonprofit Internet Society and its standards organization, the Internet Engineering Task Force; the UN’s International Telecommunications Union; the independent members of the Internet Governance Caucus; and the World Wide Web Consortium, among others.

The Future is in the Making
The Future is in the Making

The Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance will be convened by ICANN April 23-24, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. A path for the evolving future of the global Internet governance ecosystem will be mapped out during this meeting.

Real Global Governance
Real Global Governance

ICANN’s work is governed by a multi-stakeholder model with participants from civil society, governments, research institutions, NGOs, technical groups, and companies. ICANN will use this model to define a transition plan away from US DOC oversight in the coming year. The multi-stakeholder model is different than the multilateral model proposed through the UN and believed to be more responsive to the needs of users, as well as less subject to political considerations.

The Value of a Borderless Internet? Priceless
The Value of a Borderless Internet? Priceless

The Boston Consulting Group estimated the value of the connected global Internet to be approximately $4.2 trillion by 2016 in the G-20 economies alone, demonstrating the value of a frictionless and borderless Internet as essential to the modern economy.

The Future is in the Making
The Future is in the Making

The Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance will be convened by ICANN April 23-24, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. A path for the evolving future of the global Internet governance ecosystem will be mapped out during this meeting.

The Value of a Borderless Internet? Priceless
The Value of a Borderless Internet? Priceless

The Boston Consulting Group estimated the value of the connected global Internet to be approximately $4.2 trillion by 2016 in the G-20 economies alone, demonstrating the value of a frictionless and borderless Internet as essential to the modern economy.

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